Tag Archives: New Books

New Picture Books Galore – January & February 2012

Here is a list of some picture books I am excited about that were released in the month of January and February! I will try to come out with this list on a monthly basis; since this is the first, both months are squished into one.


Plant A Kiss
by Amy Krouse Rosenthal: Little Miss planted a kiss . . . One small act of love blooms into something bigger and more dazzling than Little Miss could have ever imagined in this epic journey about life, kindness, and giving.


Maudie & Bear
by Jan Ormerod: Bear’s world revolves around Maudie. Maudie’s world also revolves around Maudie. This book is delightful!


One Cool Friend
by Tony Buzzeo: On a momentous visit to the aquarium, Elliot discovers his dream pet: a penguin. It’s just proper enough for a straight-laced boy like him. And when he asks his father if he may have one (please and thank you), his father says yes. Elliot should have realized that Dad probably thought he meant a stuffed penguin and not a real one . . . With illustrations from David Small, this picture book is utterly cool-dorable (Cool + Adorable).


Zoo Girl
by Rebecca Elliot: Zoo girl has no family. In the children’s home, she feels lost and alone. On a trip to the zoo, she is accidentally left behind. But the animals love her—and when she’s discovered snuggled in a cage with the tigers by the zoo keepers and brought back to the orphanage, she doesn’t want to go. Thankfully, the keepers know when they first see her that they have found a daughter at last, and return shortly with adoption papers to take her home with them. Zoo girl has found her family at last!


Extra Yarn
by Mac Barnett: This looks like an ordinary box full of ordinary yarn. But it turns out it isn’t. Illustrated by Jon Klassen, this picture book is truly lovely. A town turns from drab to colorful with knitted sweaters.


Another Brother
by Matthew Cordell: Life for Davy was glorious as long as he had his mother and father to himself. But then he got a brother, Petey. When Davy sang, Petey cried. When Davy created a masterpiece, Petey spat up on it. And then he got another brother, Mike! And another, Stu! And another, Gil! Until he had TWELVE LITTLE BROTHERS! And that was only the beginning!


Gideon


Gideon & Otto
by Olivier Dunrea: Meet Gideon, the newest addition to Olivier Dunrea’s gaggle of adorable goslings! Gideon likes to splash with the ducklings, hop with the frogs, play chase-the-piglets, and scamper all over the farmyard. But one thing busy Gideon does not want to do is take his nap, no matter how many times his mother asks . . . until he gets tired, of course.


Duck for a Day
by Meg McKinlay: Abby’s class has a duck named Max who waddles and quacks and makes your feet all warm when he sits on them. Even though Max is a duck with demands – from an ideal aquatic environment to fresh strawberries – Abby might get to take him home overnight, if she can make everything perfect. And Abby is sure she can do it. The problem is, weird Noah from next door wants to take Max home, too. Abby can hear him digging on his side of the fence, but she knows he’ll never get Max. A duck needs calm, and what can Noah do about his chaotic backyard and noisy sisters?


What Color is My World? The Lost History of African-American Inventors
by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Raymond Obstfeld: Did you know that James West invented the microphone in your cell phone? That Fred Jones invented the refrigerated truck that makes supermarkets possible? Or that Dr. Percy Julian synthesized cortisone from soy, easing untold people’s pain? These are just some of the black inventors and innovators scoring big points in this dynamic look at several unsung heroes who shared a desire to improve people’s lives. Offering profiles with fast facts on flaps and framed by a funny contemporary story featuring two feisty twins, here is a nod to the minds behind the gamma electric cell and the ice-cream scoop, improvements to traffic lights, open-heart surgery, and more – inventors whose ingenuity and perseverance against great odds made our world safer, better, and brighter.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Picture Books